Friday, February 13, 2009

Home sweet home


Isn't this the most extraordinary image? A tidal wave hit Newfoundland's south coast in 1929. Many, many coastal properties were destroyed. This submerged house is being towed by a schooner. The scale is amazing, you can see just how huge some of those Grand Bank schooners were. This picture comes from the Provincial Archives of Newfoundland and Labrador. I just love it.

11 comments:

Anne said...

Very cool photo! You're right ... you do get an incredible sense of how large that boat is, when you see it towing a house! :-)

daisies said...

wow ... so very cool :)

Alice said...

that is an amazing photo!

*~tabby~* crooked heart art said...

hauntingly beautiful
enjoy your day
tabby :)

Tess said...

wow

ceanandjen said...

Wow, it is indeed an amazing photo! xo

Loth said...

Wow. I really really want to go to Newfoundland some day.

Sue said...

Scary picture!! We are someday suppose to retire to an island off of New Jersey...This is my worst fear...a tidal wave and our final home....all paid for....out in the middle of the ocean...

Bunny said...

Definitely one of the worst incidents to hit the outports; I do love exploring the history of the island. Have you checked out the MUN folklore archives? There are newspapers, Christmas magazines, everything. A lot of it can be downloaded in PDF form for easy reading, which is awesome.

Being born and raised on the south coast, I can tell you that we do get some crazy weather here.

As always, loving your blog. :)

Bunny

Sara said...

That is really a BIG boat! (ship)

Love the fact that you found such a great photo to share...

Cape Cod Kitty said...

What an amazing photo! It also reminded me that I had been going to mention to you that my granddaughter's paternal grandparents lost their hand-built sailing vessel in Halifax harbor a few years ago during the hurricane....it was a very interesting boat called Larinda. Did you see it before it sank, or do you remember it? It was sad, and now the builder/owner is dead. My granddaughter used to work on the ship in the summer as a guide when they sailed into ports up and down the East coast.
Cheers to you, Shelagh!